Getting PBOT/OMF-HUCIRP to remove transient camp that is 100% blocking the bike lane

So, those of you who have gone south on SW 13th Avenue all the way to Montgomery knows that transient activity has unlawfully closed 100% width of bike lane for about 100 ft by PSU parking structure. So far, One Point of Contact/OMF-HUCIRP or PBOT has not been responsive to abating this. Has our city now unofficially placed bicyclists’ use of bicycle lanes into lower importance than transients’ unlawful occupancy of bike lane?

I don’t think the city has the resources or the wherewithal to do much to keep trails and bike lanes clear anymore. I hate to say it, but I think you’re out of luck.

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I think your framing of the problem is too simplistic. The amount of people living outside has overwhelmed our city. For a variety of interwoven and complex reasons they are not doing enough to keep folks from living on sidewalks and blocking right-of-way. I too wish these blockages weren’t happening, but I also think that until we figure out how to solve the problem we need to just respectfully move around folks and we need to not act like our need for clear bike lanes is more important than people whose stuff is blocking them. That’s a slippery slope to dehumanizing these folks. I hope we can work on fixing this problem without resorting to meanness and anger at our fellow Portlanders.

Last I checked, it’s an absolute open space on the lush lawn along Reed College Place that stretches for like a mile in the Eastmoreland neighborhood.

While I can agree with your statement I would like to see the city step up and place orange cones or perhaps warning signs to alert riders unfamiliar with the area of bike path narrowing or blockage that may require slowing or dismounting. For me, I have accepted these camps and developed routes that avoid these areas.

Unfortunately, the OMF-HUCIRP working division of the city has been especially incompetent even before the pandemic and they’re the point of frustration for a lot of legitimate community members.

I would like to see the city step up and place orange cones or perhaps warning signs to alert riders unfamiliar with the area of bike path narrowing or blockage that may require slowing or dismounting. For me, I have accepted these camps and developed routes that avoid these areas

Sounds like a great way to lose these facilities permanently.

We’re almost there with the 205 path in several spots

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The homeless are not the problem. The problem is that the City relegates cyclists and their infrastructure to lower-class status, while viewing drivers as aristocracy. This is also why laws granting pedestrian rights at every intersection are widely ignored.

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