Banning street camping would move us towards VISION ZERO GOALS (another tragic loss of life due to a vehicle)

Another death of a street camper by a vehicle. Allowing street camping is inhumane and unsafe. It needs to end.

A man is dead after a vehicle struck his tent alongside I-205.

On Sunday, December 5, 2021 at 3:22a.m., East Precinct officers were dispatched to a report of a crash on northbound Interstate-205 at the Southeast Powell Boulevard offramp. When they arrived they located a crashed Honda sedan that appeared to have left the roadway and struck the occupied tent.

The occupant of the tent, an adult male, was deceased. The driver of the vehicle, an adult female, was transported by ambulance to the hospital with serious injuries.

The Portland Police Major Crash Team is responding to investigate. During the investigation, the ramp from northbound I-205 to Southeast Powell Boulevard is closed. If anyone has information about this incident, please reference case number 21-339498 and contact crimetips@portlandoregon.gov attention Traffic Investigations Unit or call 503 823-2103.

The PIO is not responding to the scene. More information will be released when appropriate.emphasized text

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A freeway isn’t a street. Re “Another death of a street camper by a vehicle,” what are the other deaths of street campers by vehicles?

Yep, freeway offramp camping would seem to be under ODOT jurisdiction and thus not within the scope of PBOT’s “VISON ZERO GOALS” (as styled by the OP).

But agreed, street camping IS inhumane and unsafe. In other types of large-scale housing crises such as a “big one” earthquake, we would expect massive, short-term response — whether at the state, county or city levels — until longer-term housing was ready. A couple of bits from the city’s evacuation plan, pages 24 and 25:

Affected populations will gather at reception center(s),
safe areas outside of the affected zone. Individuals
will stay at these facilities while longer-term shelter
locations are identified, opened, and staffed.

Both Multnomah
County and the Red Cross have established plans that
address sheltering.

Hesw and Jdedd,
We can spend time quibbling about ODOT jurisdiction or the semanitcs of streets vs freeways, etc. Bottom line is homeless folks are dying because they are allowed to sleep and live in dangerous places near vehicles. You get the idea.

Here are several I found in a brief Google search:

https://www.sacbee.com/news/nation-world/national/article239678603.html

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiP2pD8mM70AhUoJjQIHXrpCZsQFnoECAIQAQ&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbikeportland.org%2F2021%2F07%2F07%2Ffollowup-ne-33rd-drive-pedestrian-death-334638&usg=AOvVaw3CldFY0CKQNtI6wx5kngyn

Um, yeah. That’s why I brought up that the city and county already have plans for short-term response to housing crises, but somehow haven’t thought to deploy them. (See my previous link.)

Having plans doesn’t help if you don’t use them. Inaction and delay seems to be the M.O. of most government officials. And here in the Portland area they seem mostly interested in virtue signaling and enabling inhumane conditions in the name of “false” compassion.

My take is that the city and county officials have the long-term (ten-yearish) machinery in motion, but somehow left out the short- to mid-term pieces.

I chalk it up to a lack of … imagination? … preventing them from grasping that when thousands of people are living on the streets, that should trigger the emergency plan. Doesn’t matter that it’s not due to an easily quantified disaster such as a “big one” earthquake.

I suspect Vera Katz would have grasped it.

Transient encampment epidemic first needs proper policing of drug dealing.

Why “first”? Wouldn’t designated/mandated (non-street) camping areas make such policing easier?